Adult Heart Attack Risk Can Be Predicted Much Earlier In Life With New DNA Test

Adult Heart Attack Risk Can Be Predicted Much Earlier In Life With New DNA Test

A new low-priced, one-off genetic test known as Genomic Risk Score (GRS), is developed by an international research team, which can identify kids who are at high threat of a heart attack in later life. The team comprised scientists from the Baker Heart & Diabetes Institute of Australia and University of Leicester& the University of Cambridge of UK.

UK Biobank genomic records from 500,000 individuals, comprising over 22,000 coronary heart disease patients, between 40 and 69 Years were utilized to generate and assess the Genomic Risk Score. This new scoring system can scrutinize about 1.7 Million genetic variants in the DNA of an individual and determine their risk of prematurely developing the coronary heart disease.

In the clinical study, the scientists discovered the one-off genetic test to be superior at determining the threat of heart disease in comparison to every standard risk factor for only coronary heart disease. In addition, the capability of the test to determine the disease was scrutinized to be mostly independent of these acknowledged risk factors.

The Genomic Risk Score can be utilized to recognize the threat much earlier in life as the DNA doesn’t alter with age, facilitating avoidance with lifestyle modification and medicines, if required. The one-time test is anticipated to charge less than $50, or £40.

According to another recent study published in Circulation journal, if one experiences variations in blood pressure, weight, blood sugar level, or cholesterol, they might be at a greater risk for stroke, premature death, and heart attack compared to individuals with more stable readings.

The study is first-of-its-kind to put forward that the variation of health measures can negatively influence otherwise healthy individuals. And also it is the foremost research to demonstrate that having over one varying measure increases the threat of a stroke, death, or heart attack.

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